Futureepisodes


Experience climate change first hand

 

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Futureepisodes


Experience climate change first hand

 

Planned episodes of Biophere VR

 

 

 

Climing Kilimanjaro

Can you climb the Kilimanjaro before the ice caps disapear?

Forrest fires

You are standing at the edge of a raging forest fire and watching how quickly the flames spread between the desiccated trees. Scientists working with the Global Forest Watch have collected 400,000 satellite images of Earth’s surface, and their conclusion is that the world has lost 18 million hectares of forest in 2013, with Russia losing the most trees. Currently, the frequency of fire is higher than it has been in the last 10,000 years. Will you be able to do something about it?

Melting ice

You are standing close to the edge as collapsing sheets of Arctic ice, and you hear the howling fury as they fall into the sea. The melting of Arctic ice has caused a geopolitical race between Russia, Norway, the United States, Canada and Denmark to take advantage of the raw materials that will become available when the ice disappears. When the Northwest Passage becomes a viable transportation option, even more income may potentially be at stake. Who gets what, when?

White corals

Not all the CO2 that we release contributes to global warming. The oceans absorb more than a third of CO2 that has been released since the industrial revolution. Dive below the surface of the sea and experience the consequences. The great coral reefs, home to untold volumes of life, play an integral role in the health of our planet but are losing their colour. Scuba dive amongst bleached and dying reefs and think about what can be done to minimize the effects of climate change. 

Dalai Lamas Platau

You will experience VR sequences from the Tibetan plateau. Seventy percent of the plateau is covered year round by a thick layer of ice, also known as permafrost, in which huge stocks of methane and CO2 have accumulated. Scientists say that the glacier is melting and that the methane being released is 30 times as powerful as CO2 when it comes to triggering the greenhouse effect. 

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